• In response to the tsunami of online options and offers, retailers are reorienting their in-store selling approach through personalized, aesthetically pleasing and technology-rich features to encourage customers to stay (and spend) a while. Here’s a look at how incomparable experiences and the right interactive elements can transform brick-and-mortar into an experiential atmosphere that feels far from a store.

    1. One-Stop Shop
    For many brands, experiential means providing multiple shopping experiences under one roof. Fred Segal took this concept to new heights by transforming an entire block on West Hollywood’s Sunset Strip into the ultimate shopping destination complete with exclusive pop-ups, event spaces, a florist, a restaurant and café, and irreverent art installations.

  • 2. Offline Exclusive
    Many of today’s experiential retail concepts are based on the simple tenet that customers are drawn in by experiences superior to what they can find online. Reebok’s new South Boston headquarters and flagship uses enhanced digital displays to design and produce personalized graphic apparel and accessories on-site in minutes.

  • 3. Be the Brand
    To infuse Shinola’s shopping experience with the brand’s signature industrial vibe at its Los Angeles store, the space hosts healthy New York eatery Di Alba, popular parlor Saved Tattoo, and a 24-ft. art wall for a monthly rotation of artists, alongside Shinola’s offering of luxe leather, watches, stationery, bikes and audio equipment.

  • 4. Promote Play
    At the core of the experiential retail movement is the ability to offer customers an engaging product experience to further nudge them toward a purchase. Hourglass Cosmetics embraced this concept with a playful spin at its East Coast flagship in SoHo. The centerpiece of the space is a custom Ambient Lighting Bar where customers can experiment with and create their own highlighter palettes.

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